Technology ID
TAB-4474

Base-Covered HIV-1 Envelope Ectodomains and Their Use

E-Numbers
E-079-2022-0
Lead Inventor
Kwong, Peter (NIAID)
Co-Inventors
Mascola, John (NIAID)
Zhou, Tongqing (NIAID)
Olia, Adam (NIAID)
Rawi, Reda (NIAID)
Yang, Yongping (NIAID)
Cheng, Cheng (NIAID)
Development Stages
Pre-clinical (in vivo)
Development Status
Animal Studies
ICs
NIAID

Researchers at the Vaccine Research Center (“VRC”) of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (“NAID”) continue to pursue a safe and effective HIV-1 vaccine to combat the HIV-1/AIDS pandemic. 

       To this end, researchers have engineered the soluble HIV-1 ectodomain trimer so that it is stabilized in its prefusion conformation by artificial disulfides, helix-disrupting prolines, and other structure-based alterations.  However, mice and non-human primates immunized with these engineered soluble HIV-1 trimers produced a significant (>90% in some cases) immune response to the exposed trimer base.

      VRC researchers further modified the engineered prefusion soluble HIV-1 trimers by adding N-linked glycans to specific sites on the protein’s base to block this immunodominant surface.  They found that these N-linked glycans did reduce production of non-neutralizing antibodies directed to the trimer base.  These soluble, glycan-masked prefusion HIV-1 trimers are envisioned as being a part of a heterologous prime-boost vaccine regimen.

       This technology is available for licensing for commercial development in accordance with 35 U.S.C. § 209 and 37 CFR Part 404, as well as further development and evaluation under a research collaboration.

Commercial Applications
  • Vaccine for prevention of HIV-1 infection
  • Therapeutic vaccine for treatment of HIV-1 infection

  • Competitive Advantages
    Currently, no licensed HIV vaccine exists
    Licensing Contact:
    Petrik, Amy
    amy.petrik@nih.gov
    Phone: 301-827-0255